Reviews

This is the Reviews section. Could also be broken down by genre in the future.

Reviews

Play Their Hearts Out (2010)

All the rankings of teenage basketball players and callous attempts to sign the top-rated high schooler in the country starts at the grassroots level. Schools go out of their way to make these young boys comfortable from the very second they enter high school as a freshman. You’ve heard about it before; new houses, new cars, the best shoes, and promises that even the best coaches sometimes can’t fulfill. It starts even earlier in Play Their Hearts Out.

Reviews

Any Given Monday (2013)

It’s hard to think of a sports medicine figure as well-known as Dr. James Andrews. In addition to handling some of the trickiest operations on big-name sports stars from Adrian Peterson to Brett Favre to Albert Pujols, Andrews is the official team doctor for the Washington Redskins, the Tampa Bay Rays and both Auburn University and the University of Alabama, possibly the only figure who could survive being associated with both of those fierce rivals at once. Andrew Bucholtz takes a good look at his new book.

Reviews

Red and Me (2009)

We’ve seen the grainy footage, we’ve heard the myths, but not until the 2009 release of “Red and Me” have basketball fans taken a good long look at the relationship between Bill Russell and Red Auerbach. Although the book may leave those desperate for historical details wanting, it’s a pleasant summary of what goes down as one of the most successful coach-player dynamics in NBA history.

Reviews

Coach: The Pat Burns Story (2012)

Pat Burns’s legacy is an interesting one. The man who spent 14 years as a head coach in the NHL, spent with four different franchises, is perhaps most known for the teams he didn’t have the most success with. Even before his untimely passing in 2010 at the age of 58, there was a strong push to get him into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Now, Rosie DiManno attempts to capture his life and works, but the finished product falls just short of hitting the mark.

Reviews

Levels of the Game (1969)

In 1968, Arthur Ashe faced Clark Graebner in one of the most memorable US Open matches of all-time. The story behind the two players and their lives leading up to the historic semifinal are told by John McPhee in his book “Levels of the Game” that came out the following year. McPhee’s book gives a deep and thorough analysis of the event without making himself part of the narrative, and the book is even better for it.